1/18/2008

Grandma's Taralli - recipe






It's a sweet remembering, when I was a little child going to visit my grandma in Greci, always I brought back with me a big plastic bag full of this salty Taralli with a ring shape. They still make me think about my grandma. Eat them with some slice of salami and some piece of parmesan cheese and...obviously a glass of red wine.
Here the recipe :



TARALLI
Ingredients
10 cups of all-purpose flour
1/3 tsp of salt
1 cup of dry white wine
3/4 cup of extra virgin olive oil

Work together the flour, the wine, the oil and the salt till you obtain an elastic and homogeneous dough.
Let it rest covered with a cloth for 20 minutes in a place not too cold.
In a big pot boil some water adding 1 tablespoon full of salt..
Make now taralli getting from the dough some small sticks 8-10 long like a finger and with the same diameter of a finger : close them on theirselves placing on the tops of the two ends and pressing them with a finger in order to seal them.
Take 10 at a time and put them in the boiling water and pull them again helping yourself with a skimmer as soon as they come on the surface.
Put them on a cloth, one next to the other, draining for a few minutes.
Grease a tin and put in it taralli without letting them touch on.
Put the tin in the oven(already switched on at 400º F) and let taralli cooking for 40 minutes
(they should became of a light brown).
If you want you can flavour them: you can add, during the kneding, one of these ingredients: seeds of fennel, sesame chilly pepper, oregano, scales of dry onion. One tablespoon of spices will be enough for this quantity of dough.



11 comments:

Anonymous said...

This is a wonderful recipe, but I think the amount of salt must be a mistake. Maybe it didn't translate properly? I made these with 1/3 cup of salt, as written, and they were so salty that we could barely eat them. I have had taralli all over Italy, and I know that they are not supposed to be so salty. Maybe it should be 1/3 tsp? If you cut the salt WAY down, it is a great recipe!

Sarah said...

This is a long shot but I'm hoping you can help!

When I was a kid my grandma lived nextdoor to an Italian lady who would bake the most beautiful cookie/pastries. They were twisted, very sweet and kind of puffy. I think they were deep fried but I cannot find the recipe anywhere and have no way of finding the lovely lady who used to bake them for me!

If you have any ideas on what these might be called, or even better! A recipe for them, I'd really appreciate it. Thank you!

Sarah

Chocolat said...

Hi Sarah
maybe you are talking about fried zeppole , we use to make it for 19 th of March.Have a look to this link
http://www.deliciousitaly.com/ricetta.php?id=274&regione_id=4
Let me know.Chocolat.

Chocolat said...

@sarah maybe you are talking about 'cartellate' have look here
http://www.herdaily.com/recipes/6959/cartellate-honey-pinwheels.html

Sarah said...

Hi! Thanks so much for your response, neither of those look quite the same as the ones she made but I'm going to try both recipes and see if it is either of them! I know she didn't fill them with anything or use any honey over them, they were just plain but she may have modified the recipe herself.

Thanks again, I'll try these recipes and let you know!

Sarah

Chocolat said...

@Sara from you descrption they seems to be the 'Zeppole' they are deep fried and puffy.Many people serve them plain.Chocolat.

Anonymous said...

When I was a kid my grandma lived nextdoor to an Italian lady who would bake the most beautiful cookie/pastries. They were twisted, very sweet and kind of puffy. I think they were deep fried but I cannot find the recipe anywhere and have no way of finding the lovely lady who used to bake them for me!

These delicate cookies are called guanti (pronounced wandi which means glove. The slightly sweet pasta dough is rolled thin, cut into diamond shapes, cutting three slits in the middle and twisted through; fried in oil and dusted with powdered sugar. They are puffy and chrisp.

Anonymous said...

Actually I think Sarah that you are talking about Nacatole - traditional Italian biscuits served with a dusting of sugar! The mixture is rolled very thin and then cut (generally with a patterned cutter) into three strips and then plaited and fried in lard. Also they could be Crostoli - very similar ingredients and cooking but even thinner and more flaky.

Martin Mancuso said...

Sarah, When I was a kid in upstate New York in the late 60s and 70s Mrs. Angerame in my neighborhood used to make Guanti. And that is what you describe. Check this out. http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/ITA-CAMPANIA-CASERTA/2002-03/1016556832. I'd love to hear how it works out!

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